Commercial, Distributed Energy Resources, Energy Storage, Industrial, Regulation, Utilities, Distributed Generation, Solar  -  September 24, 2016

Weekend reads: Musk's solar roof; Trump vows deregulation; wave-powered electricity & more

Every Saturday, we'll bring you five most interesting — or quirky; it is the weekend after all — energy stories from the prior week that you may have missed from around the web. This weekend's reads:

Musk Plans to Unveil Solar Roof With Storage, Charger in October (Bloomberg News): Tesla Motors Inc. plans to introduce a new combination of solar power, battery storage and electric-vehicle charging systems at an event near San Francisco on Oct. 28. Billionaire Elon Musk, the chairman and the largest shareholder of both Tesla and SolarCity Corp., announced his plans to unveil the new product in a message on Twitter Thursday. SolarCity’s board agreed to Tesla’s offer to buy the biggest U.S. rooftop solar supplier on Aug. 1.

Donald Trump Promises Deregulation of Energy Production (Wall Street Journal): Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump promised sweeping deregulation of natural-gas, oil and coal production as part of an "America-first energy" plan. Speaking on Thursday to a conference of 1,500 gas-industry executives, managers and salespeople, Mr. Trump said he would lift restrictions on America’s "untapped energy—some $50 trillion in shale energy, oil reserves and natural gas on federal lands, in addition to hundreds of years of coal energy reserves."

Wave-powered electricity makes U.S. debut in Hawaii (CBS News): In the waters off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity. The current travels through an undersea cable for a mile to a military base, where it is fed into Oahu’s power grid - the first wave-produced electricity to go online in the U.S.

Risky Business: Hollywood Bets Big on ‘Deepwater Horizon’ (The New York Times): In Hollywood, films like "Deepwater Horizon" are not supposed to exist. When a movie's production budget climbs past $100 million, the money usually flows to superheroes, sequels or remakes. Not to a film based on the last hours of a doomed oil drilling rig whose fiery demise led to one of the largest environmental disasters in American history.

DC Circuit primer: All you need to know ahead of the Clean Power Plan's pivotal court date (Utility Dive): Make no mistake, the Clean Power Plan is almost certainly heading for an ultimate showdown at the U.S. Supreme Court. The stakes are so high that virtually any lower court decision will be challenged. But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit slated to consider the case first, with oral arguments beginning Sept. 27. So is that court's decision just a mere formality? Absolutely not, say experts.

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