Trane Technologies - Smart Energy Decisions

GHG Emissions, Industrial  -  March 16, 2021

Trane Technologies targets product emissions cut of 50%

Trane Technologies announced March 15 that it plans to reduce product carbon emissions by nearly 50% before 2030.

These new targets released by the industrial manufacturing company were validated by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi). By achieving this 2030 target, Train Technologies will be supporting its overall 2030 Sustainability Commitments, which includes its Gigaton Challenge to reduce customer emissions by one billion metric tons and supporting the Paris Agreement’s 2050 net zero global emissions target.

“As a climate innovator, we can make a significant contribution to solving climate change,” Mike Lamach, chairman and chief executive officer for Trane Technologies, said in a statement. “Fifteen percent of the world’s carbon emissions come from heating and cooling buildings, and another 10% from global food loss. We are transforming our operations and revolutionizing the way the world heats and cools buildings and moves refrigerated goods.”

Trane Technologies has been pursuing its other 2030 sustainability targets through initiatives that include the transition of 15 manufacturing locations to 100% renewable energy and the electrification of the Thermo King brand’s sustainable transport temperature control solutions. This includes the transition to a fully electric, zero-emission E-200 refrigeration unit.

The company also launched Sintesis Balance, a solution for commercial heating and cooling that is zero-emission when paired with renewable energy.

The company previously set emissions reduction targets in 2014 and achieved those targets in 2018, two years ahead of the target date. These achievements included reducing the carbon footprint of its operations by 45% and investing more than $500 million in product research and development that further reduces greenhouse gas emissions.


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