Tide launches campaign to reduce consumer product-use emissions - Smart Energy Decisions

Energy Efficiency, GHG Emissions, Industrial  -  March 18, 2021

Tide launches campaign to reduce consumer product-use emissions

Tide announced March 18 its 2030 Ambition framework to achieve sustainability commitments that include reducing absolute greenhouse gas emissions in its direct manufacturing by more than 50% between 2021 and 2030.

The laundry detergent brand cut its manufacturing emissions by 75% in the ten years leading up to 2020. Going forward, Tide will also turn its attention to reducing the emissions that result from its consumer phases, which account for over two-thirds of all greenhouse gas emissions in the laundry lifecycle. In the spring, the company will launch a North American campaign to convince consumers to switch to cold water washing, which could result in a 4.25 million metric ton reduction in emissions if achieved in three out of four laundry cycles in North American between now and 2030.

“The climate emergency we face needs urgent action from everyone. Today, Tide announces a series of goals to decrease its carbon footprint across its full value chain” Shailesh Jejurikar, chief executive officer of Fabric and Home Care at Procter & Gamble, said in a statement. “Tide’s ambition is to make cold water washing the industry standard. Over two thirds of the emissions in the laundry lifecycle come from washing clothes at home. Switching from hot to cold water reduces energy use by up to 90% and can save Americans up to $150 a year. Today we’re building on Tide’s 75 years of innovation to make every Tide load of laundry do a load of good.”

Tide previously switched to sourcing 100% of the electricity used at its manufacturing plants from renewable sources. To further reduce its carbon footprint, the company is launching a pilot development project with startup Opus12 to explore carbon capture utilization technology in its manufacturing.


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