US Steel Reflects on Progress Toward - Smart Energy Decisions

GHG Emissions, Industrial  -  June 17, 2021

US Steel Reflects on Progress Toward 2050 Net Zero

United States Steel Corporation released its 2020 Sustainability Report along with its progress toward its goal of net-zero emissions by 2050.

The steel manufacturer first committed to reducing emissions intensity by 20% back in 2019. The company has tried to reduce energy use throughout its operations by transitioning to cleaner natural gas and installing LED lighting, which saved 4,000 MWh of energy once completed.

In 2020, U.S. Steel recycled approximately 3.3 million tons of blast furnace slag and 0.4 million tons of steel slag, saving enough natural gas and other fuels from 2018 to 2020 to heat more than 3.4 million homes for a year.

A key part of U.S. Steel’s sustainability strategy has also been complying with environmental regulations and promoting the adoption of environmental policies at the local, state, national and international levels.

The company’s newest facility, Big River Steel, was the first LEED-certified steel production facility in the U.S., while other operations have included supporting the development of further carbon reduction technologies and strategies within the industry.

“Our history is defined by setting bold goals and then working together to achieve them. The climate crisis is a challenge that requires that level of commitment and big thinking,” David B. Burritt, U. S. Steel president and chief executive officer, said in a statement. “While 2020 brought some unique challenges, it also reinforced the importance of a strong domestic supply chain, anchored on a strong domestic steel industry. The people of U. S. Steel know that we must take the steel industry to a more sustainable future, and that means prioritizing innovative and profitable solutions that support our customers, our communities and our most demanding ‘customer’ – the planet.”

Tags: US Steel

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