NYC energy resiliency complex - Smart Energy Decisions

Commercial, Distributed Energy Resources, Energy Efficiency  -  June 9, 2017

Efficiency, resiliency key features in post-Sandy NYC

Artist rendering provided by CTA Architects

Nearly five years after Hurricane Sandy caused massive power outages up and down the east coast, with New York City among the hardest hit areas, developers have broke ground on a nearly $10 million natural disaster-resistant infrastructure building that will use energy technologies adapted from the event. 

According to a news release, the new building, which will house the infrastructure for the Haven Plaza  affordable housing complex, was developed in direct response to damage sustained from Hurricane Sandy. During the hurricane, a storm surge flooded a nearby generating station and knocked out the power for lights and heat to the housing complex. 

Thus, the new Haven Plaza Resiliency Building was designed to secure continuity of utility services for residents of the complex's 371 apartments during power disruptions and natural disasters. The 2,080-square foot building in the East Village in Manhattan will house three boilers for heating steam on the second level, with gas as the primary fuel; electrical meters, domestic hot water pumps, and hot water heaters on the first level; and oil backup storage in the protected sub-grade space, according to a statement from the building's architect, CTA Architects.

CTA Architects principal Daniel Allen said in a statement that the new facility "addresses Haven Plaza's need to be self-sufficient during both regular operations and in case of a natural disaster, instead of relying on a costly ConEd steam." 

The new building will also feature a green design with glass walls and a garden, the local news reported. Federal funding from a Hurricane Sandy relief package helped pay for the complex, which is a joint effort of Haven Plaza Square LLC, an affiliate of the Association of New York Catholic Homes and the New York Institute for Human Development; CTA Architects; and managing agent The Wavecrest Management Team. 

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