ArcelorMittal collaborates on decarbonizing its European steel production - Smart Energy Decisions

GHG Emissions, Industrial  -  March 19, 2021

ArcelorMittal collaborates on decarbonizing steel production

ArcelorMittal announced March 17 that it is pursuing the decarbonization of its steel production through the exploration of low-carbon hydrogen and carbon capture technologies.

The Luxembourg-based steel producer signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Air Liquide to collaborate on the decarbonization of the Dunkirk industrial basin using these technologies. The project is expected to reduce the emissions from ArcelorMittal’s steel-making facilities in Dunkirk by 2.85 metric tons of CO2 annually by 2030.

“This project represents a major technological breakthrough and confirms ArcelorMittal’s willingness to profoundly and sustainably transform our production technologies, in line with our objectives to reduce our CO2 emissions by 30% by 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050,” Geert van Poelvoorde, CEO of ArcelorMittal Europe, said in a statement. “We count on the strong support of the French and European authorities in order to decarbonize the steel industry and are hopeful that this project will receive the support it needs to deliver large-scale CO2 emissions savings. The partnership with Air Liquide will enable us to further accelerate the decarbonization of our steel production and contribute to the creation of a low carbon industrial and port basin.”

ArcelorMittal plans to implement direct reduced iron unit (DRI) and submerged arc furnace technology, the subject of a preliminary study last October, at its steel production site. Air Liquide will supply low-carbon hydrogen and carbon capture technology to the Dunkirk operation, where it has previously operated industrial activities. 

The two companies jointly applied for large projects funding under the Important Project of Common European Interest scheme for hydrogen.


« Back to Energy Management

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Subscribe