Sprint announces 173.3 MW PPA with Texas wind project - Smart Energy Decisions

Commercial, Sourcing Renewables, Wind  -  September 18, 2019

VPPA a first for Sprint

Sprint signed a 12-year VPPA for 173.3 MW of wind energy from the Maryneal project under development in Texas and expected to come online in 2020.

Speaking exclusively at Smart Energy Decisions’ Renewable Energy Sourcing Forum on September 17 in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Amy Bond, energy and sustainability program manager for Sprint, gave attendees a preview of the agreement before it was announced the next day:

“I could not be more pleased to present in this Forum and announce to this audience Sprint’s very first virtual power purchase agreement in partnership with Duke Energy Renewables and orchestrated with our wonderful buyers’ agent, Schneider Electric.  In support of this 12-year VPPA, Duke will build and operate a 182 MW wind farm in Nolan Country, Texas. Sprint will purchase 95% of the project output. This agreement will match almost 30% of Sprint’s energy consumption and that will greatly offset our carbon footprint.”

Appearing at a panel discussion with Bond at the RE Sourcing Forum, Scott Macmurdo, business development director – corporate accounts at Duke Energy Renewables, said:

“Sprint’s journey is a little bit unique in the sense that they started out on this process without an overarching climate goal. Sprint illustrates that even in the absence of that goal, you can get these deals done, which is a remarkable achievement. It’s rare but it gives hope to some of those folks who may be lacking a climate goal. These deals make sense a lot of times from the economics alone, even without that sustainability aspect or individual mandate."

"Sprint is serious about minimizing its carbon impact, and operating as a more sustainable company," Sprint Foundation Chairman Doug Michelman said in a statement. "This wind project will help us make substantial progress towards offsetting the energy we use across our operations, including our headquarters, retail stores, call centers, and cell towers."

 

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