Gov. Cuomo releases nation's largest solitication - Smart Energy Decisions

Sourcing Renewables, Wind  -  July 23, 2020

Gov. Cuomo releases nation's largest solicitation for wind energy in the U.S.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced July 21 a solicitation for 2,500 MW of offshore wind energy, the largest combined clean energy solicitation in the U.S., in addition to the one announced last year for nearly 1,700 MW of clean energy.

A key component of the solicitation requires that offshore wind generators partner with one of the 11 prequalified New York ports to stage, construct, manufacture key components or coordinate operations and maintenance activities.

"During one of the most challenging years New York has ever faced, we remain laser-focused on implementing our nation-leading climate plan and growing our clean energy economy, not only to bring significant economic benefits and jobs to the state, but to quickly attack climate change at its source by reducing our emissions." Gov. Cuomo said in a statement. "With these record-breaking solicitations for renewable energy and new port infrastructure, New York continues to lead the way with the most ambitious Green New Deal in the nation, creating a future fueled by clean, renewable energy sources."

The governor also announced the issuance by NYSERDA and NYPA of the largest coordinated solicitation for land-based large-scale renewable energy by a U.S. state, which seeks to procure over 1,500 MW of renewable energy.

This solicitation could bring the state halfway toward its goal of 9,000 MW of offshore wind by 2035. Additionally, the solicitations, combined with a competitive multi-port funding opportunity, could result in $7 billion in direct investments.

The offshore wind, port infrastructure and land-based renewable energy solicitations together seek to procure approximately 12 million MWh of electricity, which could power over 1.5 million homes annually and deliver a combined $3 billion in net benefits over the 20- to 25-year life of the projects.

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