Largest solar+battery system in New York planned for JFK Airport - Smart Energy Decisions

Energy Storage, Commercial, Solar  -  December 23, 2020

Largest solar+battery system in New York planned for JFK Airport

New York State’s largest onsite solar-plus-storage system was approved to begin development at John F. Kennedy International Airport and will provide power for AirTrain JFK and the surrounding communities.

The Port Authority Board of Commissioners approved on Dec. 17 the construction of the project in the form of a carport canopy with solar panels across the airport’s Long Term Parking Lot 9. The solar-plus-battery system will include a 12.3 MW solar energy installation and 5 to 7.5 MW in battery storage capacity. 

The project is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 5,300 metric tons annually as it provides enhanced resiliency to AirTrain JFK, contributing to the Port Authority’s goal of a 35% and 80% emissions cut by 2025 and 2050, respectively. 

The Port Authority previously committed to advancing the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement and will be continuing that goal with the completion of this project. The entity first issued a Request for Proposals alongside the New York Power Authority for the project in April 2019.

“JFK Airport’s solar power canopy system -- New York State’s largest -- will be a premier example of how the Port Authority is on the forefront of employing best-in-class renewable energy strategies to help combat the threat of climate change,” Rick Cotton, Port Authority Executive Director, said in a statement. “Today’s Board authorization to start construction on the JFK solar project demonstrates our commitment to reducing air pollution and investing in our local communities through job creation and more affordable power options.”

Construction will begin in 2021 and should be completed in 2022. SunPower Corporation will develop the project and Goldman Sachs Renewable Power LLC will provide financing, ensuring no up-front cost to the Port Authority.


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