P&G Accelerates Carbon Neutral - Smart Energy Decisions

Commercial, GHG Emissions  -  September 16, 2021

P&G Accelerates Net Zero Goal to 2040

Procter & Gamble released Sept. 14 its plan to accelerate its previous climate goals and achieve net-zero emissions across its operations and supply chain by 2040.

In the interim, the consumer goods manufacturer set targets to reduce operational emissions by 50% and supply chain emissions by 40% by 2030. 

P&G previously cut emissions from its global operations 52% between 2010 and 2020 and is focusing on supporting reforestation projects to offset unavoidable emissions. Additionally, the company is already purchasing 97% clean electricity globally, showing significant progress toward its 100% renewable energy goal for 2030.

Previous work with suppliers to reduce supply chain emissions has already avoided one million metric tons from the Pampers brand alone. P&G is targeting an increase of transportation efficiency of outbound finished products by 50% by 2030.

To signal its commitment to these targets, P&G also joined the UN Race to Zero and the Business Ambition for 1.5°C campaigns.

To continue reducing its operational emissions, P&G has pursued geothermal, solar and renewable steam sources for its manufacturing sites and joined the Renewable Thermal Collaborative to further develop thermal energy technology.

“While no one has all of the answers on how to bring a net zero future into focus, we will not let uncertainty hold us back,” Virginie Helias, P&G’s chief sustainability officer, said in a statement. “To achieve these goals, we will leverage existing solutions and seek transformative new ones that are not available in the marketplace today. This will require partnership across the private, nonprofit, and public sectors and involve every aspect of our business, from the very beginning of our products’ lifecycle to the very end.”

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